Support Blog

Catalina's Secret Disk

In macOS Catalina, your startup disk has a secret. When looking at a hard drive in the Finder, a single icon to represent that volume. In Catalina, your startup disk is now comprised of two volumes, but will still show up as one when viewed from the Finder. Under the hood, the system now resides on a read-only volume, while your data is stored on a separate volume. Catalina uses some tricks to present the two as one whole volume.

Catalina Disks

When using Techtool Pro 12 with Catalina, the Volume Structures test or Volume Rebuild tool will list both the system and data partitions. The read-only system volume will be the name of your startup disk, while the data volume will be the name of the startup disk with the word Data added to the end of the volume name.

Read more: Catalina's Secret Disk

More on Check Computer Suites

If you have upgraded to Techtool Pro 12, Check Computer Suites can give you quick access to custom Check Computer configurations. The three built-in tests are useful for quick configuration, but much more customization is also available.

TTP Suites

To set up your own custom suites, start by choosing Configure... from the Suites drop-down menu in the Check Computer configuration pane. This will open the Check Computer preferences, where suites can be customized. After changing any number of tests to your liking, you can save the new suite by choosing Save As... in the preference window's drop-down menu.

Read more: More on Check Computer Suites

When you need help getting home

Techtool Pro provides a number of ways to create a secondary startup disk for troubleshooting purposes. The eDrive and Protogo tools provide ways to either add a startup partition to an existing disk or create a dedicated drive, respectively. Whether you've created an eDrive or Protogo device, when you're done using it, you (most likely) will want to return to your primary startup disk.

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The Startup Disk system preference pane is perhaps the most familiar way for assigning a startup disk for your Mac. It's certainly the most straightforward. Open the Startup Disk system preference pane, select a startup disk and you're done. It may not be the best method, however, when you want to start up from a different startup disk only once. The reason for this is that when you select a startup disk in System Preferences, you're telling your Mac that you always want to use that disk to be your startup disk.

Read more: When you need help getting home

Customized Testing with Check Computer Suites

If you haven't heard, Techtool Pro 12 is now available for download, and one of its new features is called Check Computer Suites. With these suites, you can define what Check Computer will test when it is run. The three built-in tests are useful for quick configuration, but much more customization is also available.

CC Config Volume Structures

To set up your own custom suites, start by choosing Configure... from the Suites drop-down menu in the Check Computer configuration pane. This will open the Check Computer preferences, where suites can be customized. After changing any number of tests to your liking, you can save the new suite by choosing Save As... in the preference window's drop-down menu.

Read more: Customized Testing with Check Computer Suites

 

Updating your eDrive

When updates are released, either for macOS or Techtool Pro, it is a good idea to also make sure that your eDrive is up to date. Note that updating the macOS or Techtool Pro on your main startup disk won't update your eDrive, because the eDrive exists on a separate partition.eDrive desert

Here are our recommendations for the best way to keep your eDrive up to date.

Read more: Updating your eDrive

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